The “Woke” General
Who Launched Memorial Day

By Ray Cavanaugh Tracing the origins of Memorial Day can become rather convoluted. After all, about two-dozen U.S. communities claim to have held the first such commemoration. On a less contested level, Gen. John A. Logan was the man who established an official day to honor military persons who made the ultimate sacrifice. Born on Feb. 9, 1826, in Jackson County, Illinois, he was one of ten...

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Maud Gonne and Famines in the 1890s

By Christine Kinealy Maud Gonne is frequently remembered as the unrequited love interest of the poet, W.B. Yeats, while her accomplishments as a nationalist, artist, actor, lecturer, polemist, writer and social activist are often marginalized. In particular, Maud’s role in engaging with the perennial poverty and intermittent subsistence crises that dogged Ireland in the final decade of the 19th...

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History Loves a Parade
260 Years of the New York
St. Patrick’s Day Parade

Wednesday, March 17, 2021 4:00 pm EST, 8:00 pm Ireland The New York Irish Center Presents: History Loves A Parade An online Salute to 260 Years of the New York Saint Patrick’s Day Parade. Explore key milestones of the St. Patrick’s Day Parade in North America from Colonial times to the present. Featuring archival images and new photography, guest musicians, and original interviews with...

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The History of Early Irish Immigrants in Denver

The Rocky Mountain Irish Roots Collective presents a virtual history session InSights & InPerson~Connections: Irish Immigrants in Early Denver Tuesday, March 16th, 7:00 pm MST – Zoom Conferencing, $3.00 members, $5.00 general public Join Curatorial Services and Collections Access staff at History Colorado Center as we host Dr. James Walsh, an Associate Clinical Professor in the...

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The Life and Death
of Seneca Village

An exhibition tells the story of an interracial community destroyed to make way for New York’s Central Park. By Jill Fergus Dog walkers and joggers nonchalantly stepping over the barely visible cobblestones embedded in a grassy patch in New York’s Central Park have no idea that those stones were church foundations of a once prosperous enclave called Seneca Village. Begun in...

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