Fáilte go hÉireann

℘℘℘ A journey through the native Irish-speaking areas of Ireland These are the words of welcome that Irish people have greeted visitors with for centuries. They may well be the words that greet you when you visit. If they are, I urge you to take time to grasp their deeper meaning. Venture beyond the tourist hotspots and gain an insight into an older Ireland by exploring its...

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Tragedy over the Reeks

℘℘℘ The MacGillycuddy Reeks, Ireland’s tallest mountain range, stretches across the Iveragh Peninsula in the southwest section of the Emerald Isle. The area is steeped in ancient mythology and its scenic landscape is dominated by jagged, narrow spines cloaked in billowy clouds and flocks of sheep grazing in the glens below. Sadly, however, this picturesque setting also served as the...

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Mighty Mayo

Steeped in history with landscapes that go from brilliant beaches to windswept boglands, lakes, mountains to islands, pilgrimage sites to pirate queens, Mayo has it all. ℘℘℘ There’s something about Mayo… Oh, the Green and Red of Mayo I can see it still Its soft and craggy bogland Its tall majestic hills Where the ocean kisses Ireland And the waves caress its shore Oh the...

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Boats along Haven Coast in Kinsale, County Cork. (Photos: Tourism Ireland)

West Cork

Take a walk (or a drive) on the wild side. West Cork offers an abundance of wildlife, nature, and scenery. ℘℘℘ Is there a more intriguing place in Ireland than West Cork? On a recent trip, I was dazzled by the wild beauty of its rugged coastline. I loved its small towns and villages, each buzzing with life. And I was thrilled to uncover its history through sites that still hold echoes of...

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“Sláinte, Mon!”:
The Irish of Jamaica

That Irish is Jamaica’s second-most predominant ethnicity may come as a surprise, especially to those outside the country. It all started in 1655 when the British failed in their efforts to claim Santo Domingo from the Spaniards and took Jamaica as a consolation prize. Of course, the British also had been quite active in Ireland, where, between 1641 and 1652, about half the population had been...

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