That Further Shore: A Memoir of Irish Roots and American Promise

John D. Feerick’s rise, from child of Irish immigrants to the hallowed halls of Fordham Law School, is covered in his new book, reviewed here by Stephen Fearon. It is often remarked that although the overwhelming majority of Irish immigrants to America in the early 20th century were literate and fluent in the English language, very few of them recorded their life stories in diaries or other...

More

The Transatlantic Cable That Changed the World

Colin Lacey writes about the historic underwater cable that linked Kerry’s Valentia Island to Heart’s Content, Newfoundland, and why the island deserves to be added to UNESCO’s list of World Heritage Sites. The connections between Ireland and Newfoundland run deep. The Irish began visiting there as far back as the 17th century, first as seasonal fishermen, and later migrating with their...

More

To Live For Ireland

Mary Pat Kelly writes about her friendship with politician and peacemaker, John Hume.

“Mr. Hume says Northern Ireland is too complicated to reduce to a Yes/No proposition,” Ted Smyth said to me. Fall 1976. I’m an Associate Producer at Good Morning America and Ted’s the Press Secretary for the Irish Embassy. We didn’t realize how young we were – Ted wasn’t 30; I was 31 and John Hume hadn’t turned 40. “But,” I said, “this would be his chance to reach millions...

More

Darina Molloy on the latest offerings from Irish writers

Exciting Times By Naoise Dolan Exciting times, indeed … if by exciting you mean shocking, startling, hair-raising and mind-blowing. Certainly not thrilling, exhilarating, or intoxicating. But Naoise Dolan wasn’t to know that her book would be published slap bang in the middle of a global pandemic; she’s probably had a moment or two of wry reflection since about the title. Dolan’s...

More

Hamill’s Best Piece of Writing

By Tom Deignan The year was 1997 and I was fresh out of college, with a head full of words and dreams, an ambition to tell stories that were not being told, and to dive into the hurly-burly of big ideas about America and the world. In other words, I really needed a job. By then I had already been corresponding (which is to say, pestering) great wordsmiths and storytellers like Peter...

More