Boston Mayor Marty Walsh: Irish American of the Year

Irish American Partnership President and CEO Joe Leary (left) and Irish America magazine co-founder Patricia Harty (right) with Boston Mayor Marty Walsh (center) holding the Waterford House of Crystal 2014 Irish American of the Year award. PHOTOS by Harry Brett.

By Irish America Staff
June 27, 2014

 

A version of this post originally appeared on Irish Massachusetts.

A transcript of Mayor Walsh’s acceptance can be found at the end of this post.

 

Irish America magazine is delighted to honor Mayor Marty Walsh as the 2014 Irish American of the Year.

Mayor Walsh was presented with the Irish American of the Year award by Irish America magazine at a luncheon on Thursday, June 26th at the Seaport Hotel in South Boston. With his extraordinary success and achievement in becoming the Mayor of Boston, Mayor Walsh exemplifies the spirit and determination of the Irish in so many profound ways.

The event was hosted by the Irish American Partnership.

Speaking on behalf of the Partnership was Mary Sugrue McAleer, who highlighted the organization’s support of Irish schools and communities, as well as expanding job creating opportunities throughout Ireland, north and south.

Patricia Harty, co-founder and editor-in-chief of Irish America magazine, praised Walsh for his empathy and for overcoming challenges early in his life, saying, “Who better to embody the tough, tireless, tender trajectory of our Irish story than Mayor Marty Walsh, son of immigrants and champion of the working class. We are thrilled to honor him as our Irish American of the Year.”

Attendees at the event included (from left): Mary Sugrue McAleer, Executive Director, Irish American Partnership; Breandán Ó Caollaí, Consul General of Ireland in Boston; Patricia Harty, Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief Irish America magazine; Massachusetts State Senator Linda Dorcena Forry; and Joe Leary, President and CEO of the Irish American Partnership.

Attendees at the event included (from left): Mary Sugrue McAleer, Executive Director, Irish American Partnership; Breandán Ó Caollaí, Consul General of Ireland in Boston; Patricia Harty, Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief Irish America magazine; Massachusetts State Senator Linda Dorcena Forry; and Joe Leary, President and CEO of the Irish American Partnership.

Mayor Walsh, who was profiled in our February/March 2014 issueis the son of Irish parents who emigrated from Connemara in County Galway to Boston in the 1950s and settled in the city’s Dorchester neighborhood.

Upon accepting the award, Mayor Walsh said, “I find it important as an Irish American, and not just for Irish Americans but for people of any heritage, that it’s important to keep your heritage alive. It’s important to learn the traditions – It certainly was in my house.

“I’ve got a lot of awards and a lot of plaques, but this award means a lot to me because of where I grew up and how I grew up,” the mayor continued. “I’m honored to receive this award.”

Mayor Marty Walsh.

Mayor Marty Walsh.

Walsh is the thirteenth Boston Mayor of Irish descent to hold the office, which began with the election of Hugh O’Brien, an immigrant from County Cork, who served from 1885-88. In accepting this honor, Mayor Walsh joins a stellar list of honorees including President Bill Clinton, Senator Edward Kennedy and silver screen legend Maureen O’Hara.

Mayor Walsh also noted that his first official international trip as Boston’s mayor will be to Ireland, both the South and the North. “There are companies in this room that have ties to Ireland and I’m excited to strengthen those ties,” he said.

Those in attendance included Boston’s Consul General Breandán Ó Caollaí; James Brett, the former politician who is president and CEO of The New England Council; Dave Greaney, President of Synergy Investments; Paul Jennings, managing director at Silicon Valley Bank; Jim O’Brien, who brought American college football to Ireland; Father Jack Ahern of Blessed Mother Teresa Parish in Dorchester, and Michael Quinlin (who wrote the cover story on Mayor Walsh) and his wife Colette. Massachusetts Commonwealth Senator Linda Dorcena Forry from Dorchester, also made an appearance. The lunch was sponsored by VPNE Parking Solutions.

Joe Leary, Breandán Ó Caollaí, Patricia Harty, and Mary Sugrue McAleer with Mayor Walsh (center).

Joe Leary, Breandán Ó Caollaí, Patricia Harty, and Mary Sugrue McAleer with Mayor Walsh (center).

TRANSCRIPT

I’d like to thank everyone at Irish America magazine, and the Irish American Partnership for all that they do.  Especially,  what the Partnership does in terms of supporting primary education in Ireland, including the school in Connemara that my mother attended.

A lot of people in this room are very active in the Irish American community and I think that’s very important for us. Irish America magazine is an important one. And we also have the Boston Irish Reporter here in Dorchester that tells a lot of stories as well. I find it important as an Irish American, and not just for Irish Americans but for people of any heritage, it’s important to keep your heritage alive. It’s important to learn the traditions – It certainly was in my house.

I grew up in a house where both my parents were from Ireland. We would go to Ireland in the summertime and we’d come back and we’d bring in about 75 pounds of Irish sausages, some Irish bacon, a box of crunchies, and  tea bags. [laughs]. I’m proud of the family I grew up in. And because we went back to Ireland an awful lot I had a chance to go back to Connemara and work on the farm. I had a chance to get to know my mother’s mother and father. They were very active when I was a kid so I was able to learn what my mother and father went through. Especially my father when it came to cutting the turf and cutting the hay and making sure that the cattle were okay. We went back often and we learned about the tradition and a lot of us have kept those traditions alive here in Boston. I’m very proud of who I am and who I come from.

I’m proud as Mayor of the City of Boston that I can build relationships. My first international trip as mayor is going to be to Ireland and I’m looking forward to that.  There are companies in this room that have ties to Ireland and I’m excited to strengthen those ties.

I’m also proud that the first sister city agreement I signed as Mayor of the City of Boston was with Belfast, another great Irish city in the North. Máirtín Ó Muilleoir, the mayor of Belfast, was here and we had a chance to sign this historic agreement. I’m going to go to Belfast as well because there are real connections we can make there as well. You hear a lot about “growth,” and you hear a lot about different countries like China and other places around the world that we need to have relations with, but Ireland is a key component of those relations. So I’m very honored that I was able to sign my first sister city agreement with Belfast.

Ireland has a booming high tech industry and there is a big presence from companies here over in Ireland; in Boston too we’re promoting more high tech. We’re also promoting more tourism here in the city of Boston. We want to make sure that Boston becomes a destination point. We want to increase our tourism from Ireland but also we have to give back the favor so Ireland is promoting their tourism here with us. These ties are very, very important.

You know, I’ve got a lot of awards and a lot of plaques, but this award means a lot to me because of where I grew up and how I grew up. I’ve told this story many times, but when I was 18 years old I went to work construction with my father in the summer. He would leave the house and go to mass at St. Anthony Shrine every single morning. Work would usually start at seven but he’d be leaving at five and would have to drag me in at five down to the waterfront and find one of the doorways and sit me there from five to seven in the morning and wait for work to start.  And because my first job was [unloading] international crates I understood the value of working hard. My father is one of 13, my mother’s one of seven and we may not always get along, but when you think about what’s common about all of us, it’s the theme of being proud of where we came from.

I’m honored to receive this award as well to be in the company of people like John Sweeny, the former president of the AFL-CIO. And I also want to acknowledge Jack Ahern who is my pastor at Blessed Mother Teresa Parish in Dorchester. He has a number of churches under him and he does incredible work in the neighborhood and comes to a lot of different events, but this is a guy who is an unsung hero, working with some of the toughest neighborhoods in the city of Boston to improve the quality of life but doesn’t get a lot of accolades for it. He came here from Brookline and wanted to come to Dorchester. He’s working very hard so I want to thank you Father Jack for being here.

This award however, this recognition, really isn’t about me. It’s about preserving your heritage and never forgetting your heritage. I think that’s an important piece.

I think people have to understand the struggles that others have. Whether they were in the South during the turn of the century in counties like Cork and Kerry, or in the North in Belfast and Derry in the Troubles, or whether it’s on the east coast or the west coast, or in Dublin or Galway, or anywhere in between, we have to remember our history. Irish history is not one filled with victories in battle; it was one of struggle where we ultimately persevered and got those victories through hard work.

Finally, I’d like to call on you, before we leave here, to take a moment just to think about your own heritage, because that’s who we are. We’re about our heritage. We’re about the people who came to this country. Most of us in this room, all of us probably, [our ancestors] came to this country from somewhere else. There’s no one in this room whose family started here, and I would ask you to think about your heritage. Take a moment to sit back and ask, “Why do I have this opportunity?”

I think about it every single day. Behind my desk at city hall there is a hand holding a piece of rebar. And it’s for me to remember exactly where I came from – my father coming to this country and working extremely hard; my mother coming to this country, working hard, just to give me the opportunity to someday sit in the Mayor’s office in the City of Boston.

So thank you very much.

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