Posts Tagged ‘Weekly Comment’

Weekly Comment:
Ireland’s Brexit Breakthrough

The Republic of Ireland and the U.K. reached a deal in early December assuring Ireland that there would be no hard border on the island after Britain leaves the E.U., allowing Brexit negotiations to move on to phase two. Previously, president of the European Council Donald Tusk said Ireland, as an E.U. member state, would beRead more..

Weekly Comment:
How the Irish Saved the Pilgrims and Started Thanksgiving

In 1621, the pilgrims, just arrived in the New World, had no idea how wild their new frontier could be. Winter arrived and with it came starvation, death, and the idea that maybe it was time to give up and go back to Europe where the strict confines of politics were easier to deal withRead more..

Weekly Comment:
Grandfather’s War Years

What’s in a photograph? Writer John Fay reflects on an image of a grandfather he never knew as he’s being sent to World War I. ℘℘℘ My grandfather, John Fay, was born in Finavarra, County Clare in 1896. The youngest of twelve children, he grew up on a farm that juts out into Galway Bay.Read more..

Weekly Comment:
Punk and the Peace Process

In 1978, Northern Irish punk rock band The Undertones released their debut single, “Teenage Kicks.” The track opened with the punchy and iconic lyric, “Are teenage dreams so hard to beat?” The answer was a resounding yes, and the song became an instant anthem for the followers of Northern Ireland’s punk movement. With a newRead more..

Weekly Comment:
The Irish of Labor History

As you gather round the barbecue pit or head to the beach this Labor Day weekend, consider the contribution that the Irish have made, and continue to make to the American labor movement. It was Peter McGuire who first proposed a national holiday for workers. Born to Irish immigrants on the Lower East Side, New York City, inRead more..

Weekly Comment:
Francis Sheehy Skeffington’s Granddaughter to Retrace her Grandmother’s U.S. Tour

Irish activist re-creating grandmother’s 1917 tour of United States in documentary film, Hanna and Me. ℘℘℘ During Easter Week 1916, Irish pacifist Francis Sheehy Skeffington was shot without trial by British firing squad. A year later, his widow, Hanna, escaped to the United States under a false passport, giving speeches across the country exposing theRead more..

Weekly Comment:
The Beautiful Northern Ireland Locations of Game of Thrones

Season seven of Game of Thrones premieres this week. Rickon is still dead; Jon Snow is still not dead; Cercei is still terrible; Daenerys is coming home; and Tyrion may or may not be a Targaryen (but definitely is). With the action shifting back to Westeros and the North (No king but the king inRead more..

Weekly Comment:
The Boys of Summer

Writer Holly Millea on how an old baseball photo convinced her father to embrace technology. ℘℘℘ For years my father, Roger Millea, a retired urologist, has refused to use a computer. So for his 83rd birthday, I flew to Rapid City, South Dakota, presented him with an iPad, and tutored him against his will inRead more..

Weekly Comment:
Preserving The Quiet Man Railway Station

In John Ford’s 1952 The Quiet Man, the introduction of Irish American lead character Sean Thorton, portrayed by cinematic legend John Wayne, is integral to the plot that will soon unfold. The narration that accompanies his first moments on screen is simple: “A fine, soft day in spring it was when the train pulled intoRead more..

Weekly Comment:
Rising Remembered at Washington Monument

On Thursday, May 18, a plaque that signifies the 100th anniversary of the 1916 Easter Rising joined 193 other commemorative stones upon the interior walls of the Washington Monument, a 550-foot tall symbol of George Washington’s hopes for the American nation. Presented by Minister for the Office of Public Works and Flood Relief Seán Canney,Read more..