Posts Tagged ‘History’

Weekly Comment:
How the Irish Saved the Pilgrims and Started Thanksgiving

In 1621, the pilgrims, just arrived in the New World, had no idea how wild their new frontier could be. Winter arrived and with it came starvation, death, and the idea that maybe it was time to give up and go back to Europe where the strict confines of politics were easier to deal withRead more..

Weekly Comment:
Grandfather’s War Years

What’s in a photograph? Writer John Fay reflects on an image of a grandfather he never knew as he’s being sent to World War I. ℘℘℘ My grandfather, John Fay, was born in Finavarra, County Clare in 1896. The youngest of twelve children, he grew up on a farm that juts out into Galway Bay.Read more..

Viking Sword Discovered in Cork

A 1,000-year-old Viking weaver’s sword was unearthed by archaeologists at the site of the former Beamer and Crawford brewery in Cork City in September. Dated back to the 11th century and perfectly-preserved, the yew sword measures roughly 11.8 inches and is patterned with human faces in the classic Ringerike Viking art style. “For a longRead more..

Green Hills, White Houses

The 200-Year Relationship Between Irish Builders and America’s Capital ℘℘℘ In September, the James Hoban Societies of the United States and Ireland organized a day-long celebration of the Irish connection to Washington, D.C., from its foundation as federal capital to its position as a world center of diplomacy, culture, and learning. In particular, the eventRead more..

Delta 13 Charlie: Reflections of an Irish Soldier in Vietnam

Michael Coyne is one of many Irish-born soldiers who served in Vietnam. A crewman on a Patton tank, he spent most of his time far from base on patrol in jungle and rice paddies.  ℘℘℘ M y name is Michael Coyne. I was born in Cornamona, Galway, 1945. When I was seven we moved hereRead more..

Custer’s Last Rally

The Battle of the Little Bighorn, the most significant engagement of the Great Sioux War of 1876, saw the defeat of General Armstrong Custer and his soldiers of the 7th Cavalry (many of them Irish) by a battalion of united Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho tribes. ℘℘℘ Few people know the pain of being dispossessedRead more..

Photo Album:
As My Mother Would Say

I can hear her now – “If I weren’t Irish, I’d be ashamed of myself!”  ℘℘℘ Yes, my mother was Irish, and full of Irish sayings, and they came out whenever she was provoked by a situation requiring a fast one-liner. They were usually preceded by, “As my mother would say.” After hearing them forRead more..

Connecticut’s Coffin Ship Art Exhibit

Aseries of art pieces portraying the struggle for survival aboard the “coffin ships” on which 1.5 million Irish escaped the Great Hunger are now on display at the Knights of Columbus Museum in New Haven, Connecticut. The exhibit, Fleeing Famine: Irish Immigration to North America, 1845-1860, includes six oil paintings of the harrowing, often-deadly conditionsRead more..

Californian Student Discovers Cork Link

A Californian student attending University College Cork had a prominent role in the centenary commemoration of the first time the U.S. Navy ever landed in Ireland, after making the discovery that her great-grandfather commanded the flotilla that arrived in Cork Harbor. Lizzie Helmer, a 20-year-old journalism student of Chico State University, was informed by herRead more..

Meagher’s Memorial, Late,
But Not Forgotten

When General Thomas Francis Meagher died, he never received a formal memorial. An Irish revolutionary turned exile, U.S. Army general, and acting governor of the Montana Territory, Meagher drowned in the Missouri River near Fort Benton, Montana in 1867, more than 2,000 miles from Brooklyn’s Green-Wood Cemetery, where his wife, Elizabeth Townsend Meagher, would beRead more..