Posts Tagged ‘History’

Weekly Comment: The Carrowkeel Cairns

The celebration of summer solstice on June 21, when the sun rises before 5 a.m. in the northern hemisphere, marks a sacred tradition in Ireland dating back 5000 years, when the power of the sun is celebrated at the burial places of ancient gods, since pre-Christian times. ℘℘℘ Ireland has a number of megalithic monuments. Well-known sites suchRead more..

Weekly Comment:
New York’s Monument to John Wolfe Ambrose is Restored

Stolen 30 years ago, New York City’s monument to the Irishman who enabled the Port of New York and New Jersey to become the largest in the world has been restored. ℘℘℘ Nearly 30 years after the bust of John Wolfe Ambrose, the Irishman who enabled New York to become one of the greatest seaRead more..

Mary Kay Henry:
A New Deal for America’s Working Poor

Mary Kay Henry, the international president of the two-million-member Service Employees International Union talks to Patricia Harty about the Fight for $15 (minimum wage) campaign, how Trump is ruining America, and growing up Catholic, one of 10 children, in a Detroit suburb. ℘℘℘ Mary Kay Henry knew early on in life that she wanted toRead more..

New Viking Finds at Site of Dublin Hotel

Archaeologists have discovered a significant number of Viking-era artifacts and architectural remains during the building of Dublin’s new Hodson Bay Hotel in the Coombe. Among the architectural findings were the ruins of 11th century Hiberno-Norse houses with post-and-wattle fences, as well as later settlements from the 13th to 14th centuries. The team also found a medieval stone well,Read more..

Irish Hunger Memorial Renovations Completed

The Irish Hunger Memorial was re-opened in late July 2017 after a year-long, $5.3 million renovation. The structure had suffered extensive water infiltration, particularly from 2012’s Hurricane Sandy, which it had not been equipped to handle in its original state. The restoration cost $4.5 million more than the initial placement of the structure, which was unveiledRead more..

“Sláinte, Mon!”:
The Irish of Jamaica

That Irish is Jamaica’s second-most predominant ethnicity may come as a surprise, especially to those outside the country. It all started in 1655 when the British failed in their efforts to claim Santo Domingo from the Spaniards and took Jamaica as a consolation prize. Of course, the British also had been quite active in Ireland,Read more..

Eunice and Eileen

Eunice Kennedy was an amazing woman who changed the way people with disabilities are treated and viewed. Who better to bring her story to light in a new biography than Eileen McNamara, another trailblazing Irish American. ℘℘℘ Eileen McNamara – the longtime Pulitzer Prize-winning Boston Globe columnist who now directs the journalism program at BrandeisRead more..

Book Notes:
Trove of Irish Civil War Letters Donated to Boston College

Six years after finding a box in her attic with her great-great-grandfather’s photographs and letters from his time in the American Civil War – and one book later – author of Yours Faithfully, Florence Burke: An Irish Immigrant Story and former educator Ellen B. Alden donated these artifacts of the early days of the IrishRead more..

Weekly Comment:
1916 Memorabilia Up For Auction at Whyte’s Dublin

In another installment of their ever-popular series of auctions called The Eclectic Collector, famed Dublin specialist art and collectable auction house Whyte’s has plenty of artifacts from Ireland’s past for purchase in their upcoming May 5 auction. These artifacts stem from the varying times of violence and revolution to times of peace and neutrality. TheRead more..

The Titanic’s Irish Legacy

An excerpt from Titanic: True Stories of her Passengers, Crew and Legacy by Nicola Pierce explores three locations notable to the Irish links to the Titanic. ℘℘℘ THE NOVA SCOTIA GRAVEYARDS It was White Star Line who paid for the headstones that went up during the autumn of 1912. The Titanic bodies, those not claimedRead more..