Posts Tagged ‘History’

Weekly Comment:
Irish America and WWI: The Story of Peter Thompson

April 6, 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of the entrance of the United States into World War I. Irish Americans were mixed about intervention in Europe’s war, some supporting the dictum “England’s difficulty isIreland’s opportunity,” but nonetheless hundred of thousands of them enlisted to fight. Among the Irish who fought in America’s military was Butte,Read more..

The Forgotten Irish Remembered at U.S. National Archives

Irish archeologist Damian Shiels, who specializes in what he calls “conflict archeology,” will launch his new book on the Irish immigrant experience during the Civil War at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. in March. Shiels’s book, The Forgotten Irish: Irish Emigrant Experiences in America, uses the archives’ widow and dependent pension files of IrishRead more..

Window on the Past:
The Battering Ram (Photos)

Sean Sexton’s photographic archive, considered the finest privately-held collection of Irish photographs in the world, provide a poignant photo-history of evictions in the final decades of the 19th century. These images created a wave of sympathy for Irish tenants and embarrassed the British government into making legislative changes.  ℘℘℘ In 1900, Queen Victoria visited IrelandRead more..

Weekly Comment:
The Magic of Dreams

Queens-born Jazz singer Tara O’Grady recently traveled to the House of Houdini in Budapest to donate a rare 19th century bible signed by Harry Houdini to the museum that bears his name in the city of his birth. ℘℘℘ My dreams are vivid, detailed, and they often come true. One night, about ten years ago, I hadRead more..

The Fabulous Murphys

Gerald Murphy and his wife, Sara, were the golden couple at the center of glamorous expatriate life in Paris and the Riviera in the 1920s, with a social circle that included many of the great artists and writers of the day. Michael Burke goes behind the scenes to look at the dynamic Murphy family’s earlyRead more..

Dead Shot Mary

New York City police officer and detective Mary Agnes Shanley (1896-1989) was the first policewoman to use a gun in an arrest. She made over 1,000 collars in her career and, at just 160 pounds, had the strength to subdue an adult male. ℘℘℘ Born in 1896, Mary Shanley and family left the poverty ofRead more..

John Quinn: The Forgotten Irish American Nationalist

John Quinn, the unpretentious Irish American lawyer who funded the Irish literary renaissance by supporting Ireland’s leading writers of the day (including W.B. Yeats and James Joyce), is less well-remembered for his involvement with Irish nationalism and his friendship with Roger Casement, the Irish-born diplomat who was knighted by King George V in 1911 andRead more..

Paddy’s Papal Absence

It sure was big news when Pope Francis, the first Latin American pontiff, was chosen. And there has been talk about the prospect of having a black or Asian pope. But amid the widening papal radar, Ireland goes overlooked. Despite the nation’s overwhelming Catholic majority and hard-fought Catholic tradition, no Irishman has likely ever comeRead more..

Irish Film Institute Brings the Past Online

The Irish Film Institute has digitized over 1,200 minutes of Irish cinema, documentary, and public information films dating back to 1910. The free online archive (available at ifiplayer.ie) also includes a number of rare Irish-American reels. “We wanted to make sure we represented as many parts of the collection as possible,” head of the archiveRead more..

California’s First Irish Hunger Memorial

The community of Eugene, California welcomed the state’s first Irish Hunger Memorial at its dedication ceremony in Saint Joseph’s Cemetery in September. It was the product of efforts by the Irish Cultural Society of Stanislaus County and the San Francisco Chapter of the Irish American Unity Conference, and about 100 locals were present to seeRead more..