Posts Tagged ‘History’

The Titanic’s Irish Legacy

An excerpt from Titanic: True Stories of her Passengers, Crew and Legacy by Nicola Pierce explores three locations notable to the Irish links to the Titanic. ℘℘℘ THE NOVA SCOTIA GRAVEYARDS It was White Star Line who paid for the headstones that went up during the autumn of 1912. The Titanic bodies, those not claimedRead more..

Weekly Comment:
Mary Todd, Abraham Lincoln, and their Irish Maids

A sneak preview of a new book, Lincoln and the Irish: The Untold Story of How the Irish Helped Abraham Lincoln Save the Union, by Irish America publisher, Niall O’Dowd. ℘℘℘ Mary Todd Lincoln was of solid Irish stock. Mary’s paternal great-grandfather, David Levi Todd, was born in County Longford, Ireland, and came to America, via Pennsylvania, to Kentucky. Another great-grandfather,Read more..

NLI to Digitize Pre-Republic History of Ireland

The National Library of Ireland rolled out plans in January for a new digital archive of modern Irish history. The archive, called Towards a Republic, will document the tumultuous series of events between 1918 and 1923, beginning with the Irish Republican Army’s brutal struggle for independence from Britain and ending with the Irish Civil War.Read more..

Divided Society Archives Available

In January the Linen Hall Library in Belfast launched a new digital archive dedicated to the Troubles. Founded in 1968, the institution has amassed over 350,000 primary sources and essays relating to the conflict in Northern Ireland, the largest collection of its kind. The archive, called Divided Society, covers the events from 1990-1998 that culminated in the GoodRead more..

End in Sight for Titanic’s “Heartbreak Pier” Restoration in Cobh

The final phase of renovations of the pier from which the Titanic launched its fateful maiden voyage began in January, with plans for completion in March 2019. This portion of the project is hoped to establish the long-abandoned structure as an attractive tourist destination. With the support of the Cork County Council and Port ofRead more..

Wild Irish Women:
Saint Brigid—Mary of the Gaels

A nun, abbess, and founder of several monasteries, Brigid of Kildare was a woman who defied authority, possessed great strength of will and determination, and whose cheerful giving of food and shelter to any passing traveler laid the foundation for Ireland’s legendary hospitality.  ℘℘℘ Saints are everywhere, like enzymes, gravity, or the CIA – invisible,Read more..

An Irish Artist’s American Odyssey

William James Hinchey traveled throughout America’s Southwest frontier and Missouri capturing images of life, the ravishes of war, and beyond.  ℘℘℘ Cormac McCarthy’s novel Blood Meridian (1985) depicts the rough, perilous place that was the American Southwest of the 1840s and ’50s. One of the earliest close-up views of the California-Arizona desert of the periodRead more..

Roscommon, Part II:
Ireland’s First President

Douglas Hyde, born in Roscommon in 1860, was a leading figure in the Gaelic revival and Ireland’s first president. ℘℘℘ A couple of unplanned events shaped the course of Douglas Hyde’s early life. He should have been born in County Sligo, where his family resided, but instead he arrived on January 17, 1860 in Castlerea, CountyRead more..

Bobby Kennedy’s Message of Unity and Raging Spirit

Chris Matthews talks about his new book, which offers valuable insights into Bobby Kennedy, and why we need someone of Kennedy’s ilk today. ℘℘℘ Next year, on St. Patrick’s Day, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art will open a new exhibit entitled “The Train: RFK’s Last Journey.” The centerpiece of the show will beRead more..

Weekly Comment:
How the Irish Saved the Pilgrims and Started Thanksgiving

In 1621, the pilgrims, just arrived in the New World, had no idea how wild their new frontier could be. Winter arrived and with it came starvation, death, and the idea that maybe it was time to give up and go back to Europe where the strict confines of politics were easier to deal withRead more..