Posts Tagged ‘History’

Wild Irish Women:
Saint Brigid—Mary of the Gaels

A nun, abbess, and founder of several monasteries, Brigid of Kildare was a woman who defied authority, possessed great strength of will and determination, and whose cheerful giving of food and shelter to any passing traveler laid the foundation for Ireland’s legendary hospitality.  ℘℘℘ Saints are everywhere, like enzymes, gravity, or the CIA – invisible,Read more..

An Irish Artist’s American Odyssey

William James Hinchey traveled throughout America’s Southwest frontier and Missouri capturing images of life, the ravishes of war, and beyond.  ℘℘℘ Cormac McCarthy’s novel Blood Meridian (1985) depicts the rough, perilous place that was the American Southwest of the 1840s and ’50s. One of the earliest close-up views of the California-Arizona desert of the periodRead more..

Roscommon, Part II:
Ireland’s First President

Douglas Hyde, born in Roscommon in 1860, was a leading figure in the Gaelic revival and Ireland’s first president. ℘℘℘ A couple of unplanned events shaped the course of Douglas Hyde’s early life. He should have been born in County Sligo, where his family resided, but instead he arrived on January 17, 1860 in Castlerea, CountyRead more..

Bobby Kennedy’s Message of Unity and Raging Spirit

Chris Matthews talks about his new book, which offers valuable insights into Bobby Kennedy, and why we need someone of Kennedy’s ilk today. ℘℘℘ Next year, on St. Patrick’s Day, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art will open a new exhibit entitled “The Train: RFK’s Last Journey.” The centerpiece of the show will beRead more..

Weekly Comment:
How the Irish Saved the Pilgrims and Started Thanksgiving

In 1621, the pilgrims, just arrived in the New World, had no idea how wild their new frontier could be. Winter arrived and with it came starvation, death, and the idea that maybe it was time to give up and go back to Europe where the strict confines of politics were easier to deal withRead more..

Weekly Comment:
Grandfather’s War Years

What’s in a photograph? Writer John Fay reflects on an image of a grandfather he never knew as he’s being sent to World War I. ℘℘℘ My grandfather, John Fay, was born in Finavarra, County Clare in 1896. The youngest of twelve children, he grew up on a farm that juts out into Galway Bay.Read more..

Viking Sword Discovered in Cork

A 1,000-year-old Viking weaver’s sword was unearthed by archaeologists at the site of the former Beamer and Crawford brewery in Cork City in September. Dated back to the 11th century and perfectly-preserved, the yew sword measures roughly 11.8 inches and is patterned with human faces in the classic Ringerike Viking art style. “For a longRead more..

Green Hills, White Houses

The 200-Year Relationship Between Irish Builders and America’s Capital ℘℘℘ In September, the James Hoban Societies of the United States and Ireland organized a day-long celebration of the Irish connection to Washington, D.C., from its foundation as federal capital to its position as a world center of diplomacy, culture, and learning. In particular, the eventRead more..

Delta 13 Charlie: Reflections of an Irish Soldier in Vietnam

Michael Coyne is one of many Irish-born soldiers who served in Vietnam. A crewman on a Patton tank, he spent most of his time far from base on patrol in jungle and rice paddies.  ℘℘℘ M y name is Michael Coyne. I was born in Cornamona, Galway, 1945. When I was seven we moved hereRead more..

Custer’s Last Rally

The Battle of the Little Bighorn, the most significant engagement of the Great Sioux War of 1876, saw the defeat of General Armstrong Custer and his soldiers of the 7th Cavalry (many of them Irish) by a battalion of united Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho tribes. ℘℘℘ Few people know the pain of being dispossessedRead more..