Posts Tagged ‘History’

Connecticut’s Coffin Ship Art Exhibit

Aseries of art pieces portraying the struggle for survival aboard the “coffin ships” on which 1.5 million Irish escaped the Great Hunger are now on display at the Knights of Columbus Museum in New Haven, Connecticut. The exhibit, Fleeing Famine: Irish Immigration to North America, 1845-1860, includes six oil paintings of the harrowing, often-deadly conditionsRead more..

Californian Student Discovers Cork Link

A Californian student attending University College Cork had a prominent role in the centenary commemoration of the first time the U.S. Navy ever landed in Ireland, after making the discovery that her great-grandfather commanded the flotilla that arrived in Cork Harbor. Lizzie Helmer, a 20-year-old journalism student of Chico State University, was informed by herRead more..

Meagher’s Memorial, Late,
But Not Forgotten

When General Thomas Francis Meagher died, he never received a formal memorial. An Irish revolutionary turned exile, U.S. Army general, and acting governor of the Montana Territory, Meagher drowned in the Missouri River near Fort Benton, Montana in 1867, more than 2,000 miles from Brooklyn’s Green-Wood Cemetery, where his wife, Elizabeth Townsend Meagher, would beRead more..

IRB Leader and Civil War Vet Remembered

The 150th anniversary commemoration of Colonel Thomas J. Kelly and the Manchester Martyrs was celebrated at the Historic Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx in April. The event included a procession to the graveside, color guard, pipes and drum, a Civil War re-enactment, and spoken word poetry. A Galway-born veteran of the American Civil War, KellyRead more..

Window on the Past:
The Georgia Healys

In antebellum Georgia, the Healy children, born legal slaves to an Irish immigrant father and his black common-law wife, had to be smuggled out of the state to avoid being sold into slavery. Several would go on to become some of the first mixed-race high-ranking members of the Catholic Church. ℘℘℘ Nineteenth century Georgia sawRead more..

Weekly Comment:
Irish America and WWI: The Story of Peter Thompson

April 6, 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of the entrance of the United States into World War I. Irish Americans were mixed about intervention in Europe’s war, some supporting the dictum “England’s difficulty isIreland’s opportunity,” but nonetheless hundred of thousands of them enlisted to fight. Among the Irish who fought in America’s military was Butte,Read more..

The Forgotten Irish Remembered at U.S. National Archives

Irish archeologist Damian Shiels, who specializes in what he calls “conflict archeology,” will launch his new book on the Irish immigrant experience during the Civil War at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. in March. Shiels’s book, The Forgotten Irish: Irish Emigrant Experiences in America, uses the archives’ widow and dependent pension files of IrishRead more..

Window on the Past:
The Battering Ram (Photos)

Sean Sexton’s photographic archive, considered the finest privately-held collection of Irish photographs in the world, provide a poignant photo-history of evictions in the final decades of the 19th century. These images created a wave of sympathy for Irish tenants and embarrassed the British government into making legislative changes.  ℘℘℘ In 1900, Queen Victoria visited IrelandRead more..

Weekly Comment:
The Magic of Dreams

Queens-born Jazz singer Tara O’Grady recently traveled to the House of Houdini in Budapest to donate a rare 19th century bible signed by Harry Houdini to the museum that bears his name in the city of his birth. ℘℘℘ My dreams are vivid, detailed, and they often come true. One night, about ten years ago, I hadRead more..

The Fabulous Murphys

Gerald Murphy and his wife, Sara, were the golden couple at the center of glamorous expatriate life in Paris and the Riviera in the 1920s, with a social circle that included many of the great artists and writers of the day. Michael Burke goes behind the scenes to look at the dynamic Murphy family’s earlyRead more..