Barbara Lynch:
Cooking for the City She Loves

With ingenuity, a lot of talent, and a passion for cooking, Barbara Lynch rose from cooking for the priests in her Southie neighborhood to one of the top chefs and restaurateurs in the country. ℘℘℘ “Seven minutes and a world away” is how Boston chef Barbara Lynch describes the two places she has straddled in her life: one fancy, expensive and tasteful, the other unadorned, modest and...

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County Clare

With the use of audio tours and drones, one of the most beautiful counties in Ireland is captured in all its glory. ℘℘℘ “It’s a long, long way from Clare to here.” These may be the words of a popular song but have you ever stopped to wonder why the singer misses this Irish county so much? What attractions does it have to offer? There is a huge amount to see and do in this county. It...

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Wild Irish Women:
The Reporter Who Wouldn’t Go Away

Dorothy is Back! Dorothy Kilgallen was a TV and radio star, a columnist who wrote about theater and film, the rich and famous, but more than anything, she was a crime reporter who, at the time of her mysterious death, was investigating the JFK assassination.  ℘℘℘ She was as tough as she was brittle, as brave as she was bitchy. At a time when few women had a career, Dorothy Mae Kilgallen...

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The Forgotten Irish American Artist of the Capitol Building

Geoffrey Cobb writes about Thomas Crawford, who sculpted the figure of Liberty and Freedom on top of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC.  Senate Pediment, marble, 1863, east front U.S. Capitol: “The Progress of Civilization” features figures that represent the early days of America along with the diversity of human endeavor. Click to enlarge. (Photo courtesy of the Architect of the...

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Mother Teanga

The Irish language has roots stretching back at least 5,000 years, and shares words with Sanskrit, the ancient classical language of India.  ℘℘℘ Almost all of us can speak a little Irish, and often do. Words like “galore” and “brogue,” for example, or “smithereens” have all passed directly from Irish into English, often with little change to their original pronunciation. So the...

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