Hospitality and History in the American South

History abounds on a tour that began in Washington, D.C. and visited Civil War battlefields, colonial towns, and the Blue Ridge Mountains. ℘℘℘ As you might expect, Memorial Day weekend is a popular time to visit the nation’s capitol. There are celebrations, a free concert by the National Symphony Orchestra on the West Lawn, and a spectacular fireworks display. However, the annual Rolling...

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Tullaghoge Fort:
Home of the O’Neills

A memorial stone and plaque were unveiled to mark the 400th anniversary of the death of Hugh O’Neill.  ℘℘℘ The re-opening of Tullaghoge Fort last June has brought one of Ireland’s most notable landmarks back into the public domain. Also known as Tulach Óg, meaning “Hill of the Youth,” it is located in the townland of Ballymully Glebe on the main Stewartstown to Cookstown road in...

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Wild Irish Women:
The Reporter Who Wouldn’t Go Away

Dorothy is Back! Dorothy Kilgallen was a TV and radio star, a columnist who wrote about theater and film, the rich and famous, but more than anything, she was a crime reporter who, at the time of her mysterious death, was investigating the JFK assassination.  ℘℘℘ She was as tough as she was brittle, as brave as she was bitchy. At a time when few women had a career, Dorothy Mae Kilgallen...

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The Forgotten Irish American Artist of the Capitol Building

Geoffrey Cobb writes about Thomas Crawford, who sculpted the figure of Liberty and Freedom on top of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC.  Senate Pediment, marble, 1863, east front U.S. Capitol: “The Progress of Civilization” features figures that represent the early days of America along with the diversity of human endeavor. Click to enlarge. (Photo courtesy of the Architect of the...

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Window on the Past:
The Georgia Healys

In antebellum Georgia, the Healy children, born legal slaves to an Irish immigrant father and his black common-law wife, had to be smuggled out of the state to avoid being sold into slavery. Several would go on to become some of the first mixed-race high-ranking members of the Catholic Church. ℘℘℘ Nineteenth century Georgia saw a remarkable phenomenon called the Healy family. The father was...

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